F [<] voltar



FATOS CURIOSOS


http://www.mgmgt.com/ endereço da representante de David.Melanie Greene
Endereço da produtora Duchovny/Leoni:
Type Production Company (Film Development)
c/o Beacon Pictures, 120 Broadway Suite 200, Santa Monica, California, United States, 90401
(310) 260-7000


Sobre o salario de David durante ARQ.X
how much DD's salary was the first few years of XF, vs. how much, say, a lead of a similar (in terms of ratings, popularity etc) TV show today gets paid? I'm just curious if anyone knows or can ballpark it. I want to know how much TV drama actors are making before their shows become big hits. Does it just depend on the network etc, or is there a similar starting salary all across the board, and has it increased in the past decade?
Originally posted by Dalon
~~~I seem to remember he stated somewhere that he was making something like $125,000 per episode. And you're right he did parlay lower actual pay with a percentage or whatever it's call from the backend. That was why he sued Fox Network sold Fox Cable the episodes to FX at a greatly reduced rate they still made out at both ends and DD was getting, well you know. He went to court and won. The same thing Alan Alda had to do on his time with MASH. The stated amount DD won was $25M with "other considerations" so I imagine he did much better than anything stated outright. This also caused something of a rift or strain on the set for a time between Carter and David. But if memory serves Carter was not named in the suit. It was the suits higher up that were doing wrong, not Chris Carter. But still the set would become uncomfortable.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



FOX settled out of court. No studio that still retains a sliver of sanity would dare allow a suit to reach the courts because a court could require that they open their accounting books to an impartial scrutiny. Imagine the howls of fear from the studio suits if that ever happens.

As I recall, one of the settlements David accepted was to appear in up to half the episodes in S8. Carter chose to squander this in banal guest-shots. The fact that the ratings shot through the roof every time David showed up should have told him something.

Carter wasn't named in the suit, but he was listed as being someone who knew what FOX was pulling. The tension was obvious at the time and extended into S8, but as far as I can tell David and Carter enjoy an amiable business relationship now. Both men are too wise in the ways of Hollywood business to hold grudges.
think that you're both right in the ballpart of what both DD and
GA made on the show---pam and Dalon---and DD's naming of CC
in his lawsuit was not as a defendant---but just like Gwaihir said.
I also remember reading at the time that DD's lawsuit included
something about CC's getting something like first dibs on a new
script to write for Fox---in exchange for his silence.However,I
could be very wrong about that,too.

CC got to produce Harsh Realm in exchange for his silence. Then FOX screwed him by canceling it after four episodes. So, he did serious damage to a years-long friendship just to be raked over the coals by FOX. Sometimes your karma runs over your dogma.
David FUMA?
Original French Transcript from Sure. Fine. Whatever.

"Come back and see me in 10 years"
by Francine Zambano, Tele-Top-matin (TTMatin)
No.29, July 19-25, 1998

...
Journalist: How do you keep yourself sane, between your work and your private life?

Duchovny: I swim, I play basketball, I don't smoke and I'm vegetarian. And yoga helps me to remain bearable towards those around me.

know that Tea smoked. I remeber David was teasing her about it in Redbook interview.

***********
TL: Of course, for some bizarre reason it hadn't occurred to me that in the end I would then be standing on a set with David directing me. I was just excited that it was a great part.

DD: She was excited because she used to be a smoker, and the script called for it.
Seriously, David's mom smoked, and he's talked about smoking his share of grass in his younger days, and unlike Bill Clinton, he freely admits to inhaling . So I'm sure he's very familar with the smoking process...

But considering the thousands upon thousands upon thousands of papparazzi pics taken over the last 15 years, it's pretty apparent that when David says he doesn't smoke, he actually apparently doesn't smoke.
A mãe de David ficou chateada porque David não terminou o Doutorado em Literatura faltando sEa dissertação par aser um Doutor?
David's said in many interviews over the years that his mother was upset that he didn't finish his education. I don't think that makes her love him any less, though. We already know he's a pretty smart dude, so whether or not he gets the doctorate doesn't really matter. He can stay ABD (All But Dissertation) forever.
If I remember correctly, he said in one of his interviews that his mother hung his bartender's diploma on the wall where his PhD should have been. :)
CR: As a young actor who came out of Yale to find this career, is this what you wanted to do and be when you thought about becoming an actor.

DD: Well, I was at Yale for English literature ...

CR: I know. (they both laugh)

DD: ... so I wasn't coming out to do this at all. No, I had always envisioned going through college and graduate school that I would teach and write - that I would teach in order to pay the bills and take 3 or 4 months off, as teachers get wonderful vacation time, and try to write in that time. So I never thought about acting, envisioned acting in any way.

CR: So how did it end up that you're here talking to me about a feature film and a very successful television series.

DD: In a way, it's just life that happens day-by-day, and then you look back. Ten years have passed and it seems to have been this momentous decision that you made, and I wish that I could take credit for having made an instinctual and wonderful decision back then, but I never did. I was interested in writing plays, maybe screenplays, and I thought it would be smart to learn something about acting, so I started hanging out at Yale with the actors - because they're more fun anyway - and enjoyed the acting that I did, started auditioning in New York, got an agent, this kind of thing, you know, just step-by-step. So in retrospect I think I was pretty smart but if you had asked me on a daily basis back in 1986 when I wasn't writing my dissertation, and I wasn't getting any acting jobs, then I would have said that I'm an idiot.

CR: What was the subject of your dissertation?

DD: It was called "Magic and Technology in Contemporary American Fiction and Poetry." (CR laughs hard) And that's the whole dissertation, right there, that's 200 pages, a 200-page title.

CR: You finished it?

DD: Oh, no. No. (he laughs)

CR: I didn't think so.

DD: No, I wrote probably a chapter. I sat through my orals, I passed my orals.

CR: Your orals for your PhD.

DD: For my PhD.

CR: Yeah. And all you had to do then was to write the dissertation.

DD: Yeah, all you had to do was write this, all you have to do is scale Everest, that's all. It's just a little hill we have here for you. And, I don't think I ever will, but I was interested in it. I just ... I'd been writing critically, writing about other people's works for a good 8 years through Princeton and Yale, and I just felt the need to do my own thing. I felt like my critical writing, although I think it was pretty good, it was always, I was using other people's works as an excuse to voice my own ... voice.

CR: What difference do you think it made that you have this background, either in terms of how you approach acting or the perception of you?

DD: I can't speak to the perception of me. I know that in the beginning, when I used to go on auditions, I would have agents that would say don't mention that you went to Yale, (CR laughs) because, for some reason people, it's not that people like their actors dumb, because I certainly met many dumb people along the way in these wonderful schools. You can find dumb ...

CR: And you met some very bright actors.

DD: Absolutely. But it's almost as if we have this prejudice that, in this country that actors are instinctual and animalistic in this way, that education hurts actors. So in that sense, people would say don't intimidate them by saying that you went to Yale, and don't let them have an out, which is "he thinks too much" or "he's not impulsive enough" ...

CR: "He's too intellectual."

DD: "He doesn't have the energy, he's not bouncing around the room." So there was that, and then in terms of my own approach, I think it helps ... the discipline that I needed, because it wasn't like I was any kind of natural at what I did in academia. I mean, I was good, but it wasn't like they were crowning me the next Harold Bloom in any way.

CR: You were not to be America's intellectual superstar.

DD: No, I don't think that I was. So I worked really hard, and I think that that discipline and that kind of critical discipline was good, was good for me. I've always had strong discipline and that's helped and I got that from being an academic.

....CR: As a young actor who came out of Yale to find this career, is this what you wanted to do and be when you thought about becoming an actor.

DD: Well, I was at Yale for English literature ...

CR: I know. (they both laugh)

DD: ... so I wasn't coming out to do this at all. No, I had always envisioned going through college and graduate school that I would teach and write - that I would teach in order to pay the bills and take 3 or 4 months off, as teachers get wonderful vacation time, and try to write in that time. So I never thought about acting, envisioned acting in any way.

CR: So how did it end up that you're here talking to me about a feature film and a very successful television series.

DD: In a way, it's just life that happens day-by-day, and then you look back. Ten years have passed and it seems to have been this momentous decision that you made, and I wish that I could take credit for having made an instinctual and wonderful decision back then, but I never did. I was interested in writing plays, maybe screenplays, and I thought it would be smart to learn something about acting, so I started hanging out at Yale with the actors - because they're more fun anyway - and enjoyed the acting that I did, started auditioning in New York, got an agent, this kind of thing, you know, just step-by-step. So in retrospect I think I was pretty smart but if you had asked me on a daily basis back in 1986 when I wasn't writing my dissertation, and I wasn't getting any acting jobs, then I would have said that I'm an idiot.

CR: What was the subject of your dissertation?

DD: It was called "Magic and Technology in Contemporary American Fiction and Poetry." (CR laughs hard) And that's the whole dissertation, right there, that's 200 pages, a 200-page title.

CR: You finished it?

DD: Oh, no. No. (he laughs)

CR: I didn't think so.

DD: No, I wrote probably a chapter. I sat through my orals, I passed my orals.

CR: Your orals for your PhD.

DD: For my PhD.

CR: Yeah. And all you had to do then was to write the dissertation.

DD: Yeah, all you had to do was write this, all you have to do is scale Everest, that's all. It's just a little hill we have here for you. And, I don't think I ever will, but I was interested in it. I just ... I'd been writing critically, writing about other people's works for a good 8 years through Princeton and Yale, and I just felt the need to do my own thing. I felt like my critical writing, although I think it was pretty good, it was always, I was using other people's works as an excuse to voice my own ... voice.

CR: What difference do you think it made that you have this background, either in terms of how you approach acting or the perception of you?

DD: I can't speak to the perception of me. I know that in the beginning, when I used to go on auditions, I would have agents that would say don't mention that you went to Yale, (CR laughs) because, for some reason people, it's not that people like their actors dumb, because I certainly met many dumb people along the way in these wonderful schools. You can find dumb ...

CR: And you met some very bright actors.

DD: Absolutely. But it's almost as if we have this prejudice that, in this country that actors are instinctual and animalistic in this way, that education hurts actors. So in that sense, people would say don't intimidate them by saying that you went to Yale, and don't let them have an out, which is "he thinks too much" or "he's not impulsive enough" ...

CR: "He's too intellectual."

DD: "He doesn't have the energy, he's not bouncing around the room." So there was that, and then in terms of my own approach, I think it helps ... the discipline that I needed, because it wasn't like I was any kind of natural at what I did in academia. I mean, I was good, but it wasn't like they were crowning me the next Harold Bloom in any way.

CR: You were not to be America's intellectual superstar.

DD: No, I don't think that I was. So I worked really hard, and I think that that discipline and that kind of critical discipline was good, was good for me. I've always had strong discipline and that's helped and I got that from being an academic.
You can order copies of his thesis directly from Princeton for the
cost of photocopying & postage. It will probably cost more than
$20 (it *is* 160 pages long!) -- but at least it will be a legal,
authorized, non-copyright-infringing copy, unlike copies
purchased from any other source (including copies purchased
from fellow fans, since everyone who buys a copy of the thesis
is legally bound NOT to photocopy it.)

http://libweb5.princeton.edu/theses...id.asp?ID=14832

Princeton University Senior Theses Full Record
TITLE: The Schizophrenic Critique of Pure Reason in Beckett's Early Novels (160 pages).
AUTHOR: David William Duchovny (1982), English Department
LOCATED AT: Mudd Library.

Contact the Princeton University Archives at the Seeley G. Mudd
Manuscript Library, 65 Olden Street, Princeton, NJ 08544;
phone 609-258-6345; fax 609-258-3385; or send email
to mudd@davidduchovny.com.br to locate a thesis of interest.

http://www.princeton.edu/mudd/news/...otocopies.shtml

How do I order photocopies?

If you visit the Mudd Library, a member of our staff will be
happy to show you how to identify materials for photocopying
and how to submit your photocopy order.

You may also order photocopies without visiting the Mudd Library.
To do so:

•_ Identify the collection, box, and folder you want copied.

•_ Send your request via e-mail (mudd@davidduchovny.com.br) or surface
mail to the Mudd Manuscript Library, 65 Olden Street , Princeton,
NJ 08544 . (Please include your name, address and fax number.)

•_ A member of our staff will estimate the total number of pages
in your order and send you our photoduplication order form.
Complete prices are available online.

•_ Return the signed form with payment (check drawn on U.S.
account or money order) to the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library.

•_ Staff will copy the materials and mail them to you. Requests
are usually completed within three weeks from date your order
and payment are received.

Note: the photoduplication form is not available online.
We do not currently accept credit cards.

I read a David article years ago that mentioned that thesis won some sort of writing award that year, so yeah, I guess it was good.
The novel was started sometime when he had just finished his
undergrad degree or was starting his grad work,Janset---and I
remember said that it would never see the light of day---if he had
anything to do with it.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



The novel was called "Wherever There Are Two" which I think was a biblical reference about a gathering of two making a church and it was about his days bartending.

There's this, about his book and thesis, including a passage:

US Magazine, 1998
"Duchovny did do some writing earlier in his life, but it was not like that. I do not have a copy of his unpublished novel, Wherever There Are Two, which details the dissolute '80s life of a bartender, a job Duchovny had around the time he wrote it. Nor do I have a copy of his unfinished Yale Ph.D. dissertation, "Magic and Technology in Contemporary American Fiction and Poetry." But I do have a copy of his 1982 Princeton senior thesis, "The Schizophrenic Critique of Pure Reason in Beckett's Early Novels."

Here is a random passage:

'In Murphy's theology, undifferentiated chaos confronts God with its unnameable yawn. Like a sculptor with flawed stone, God does his best with what he is given and puns on the word to create the world. It is not a great pun and certainly not one of Murphy's favorites. The only evidence of theophany appears as the verbal transformation of the lowly neurotic into the holy psychotic schizophrenic. '"


Who knew US Magazine had such thorough and intelligent reporters?
After that one paragraph I cant imagine trying to read the whole thing.
The Sun Is Out There
By Tim Appelo
Los Angeles Times
June 21, 1998
[...]
Duchovny once wrote a novel titled "Wherever There Are Two,"
which refers to Jesus' comment that "wherever there are two
people gathered in my name, there is the Kingdom of Heaven."
"The X-Files" is really located wherever a fan gathers with
Mulder and Scully to ponder a conspiracy conceivably extending
from the local school board to the furthest wormhole in space. ...

http://www.thebackofthemoon.com/x/News/Articles/latimes210698.html
http://www.area42.envy.nu/news02.txt
Descrpcion: David Duchovny en GQ de Alemania
Fecha: Noviembre 29/ 98
Archivado por: Maclau
Idioma: Ingles
[...]
Whatever happened to your novel "Wherever There Are Two"?

"I've lost the original manuscript. The novel is set during the
time I worked as a bartender. The title goes back to Jesus.
When asked about the new church and people wanted to know
how it could be recognized he replied: 'Wherever there are
two congregating in my name, there is a church.'"

And what happened to your scientific thesis "The Schizophrenic
Critique of Pure Reason in Beckett's Early Novels"?

"My God, how that sounds. I've recently paged through it and
hardly understood what I'd academically written. Isn't it
terrible when you find out how much smarter you used to be?"

When did you last see a play by Beckett?

"15 years ago, it was called "End Game". I've always considered
Beckett to be very funny, as I have Kafka, by the way. I've
heard that Kafka had to interrupt his public readings because
he couldn't keep from laughing. I would have liked to have
been there. I should read such things more often instead of
staring at the ceiling of my trailer during filming breaks.
Or write scripts for X Files episodes. I had the idea for
"Colony"... But for that I need tranquility and space."

Duchovny is given one return journey a month by Fox TV
between Vancouver and Los Angeles in a private plane, a
concession he was granted when he got married. This evening
he is flying home to spend his first night in he and Leoni's
new home. This flight will have four passengers: Duchovny,
Carter, Blue and me. In the car to the airport, Carter and
Duchovny discuss today's scenes, and Duchovny inquires
about how much porn noise they will be able to use. Carter
says they have to tone down the background sounds so that
nothing sounds orgasmic. "The moral is," Duchovny concludes,
"sex is OK as long as no one is coming. So, bad sex is fine."

The four of us board the tiny plane. As in real life, privilege
brings its responsibilities. We have to find and pour our own
drinks. Duchovny hands out Bacardi-and-Cokes. Up here seems
the proper moment to bring up his tract on Samuel Beckett.

"You read my thesis on Samuel Beckett'" Duchovny says,
clearly shocked. "Is it horribly pretentious!"

Naturally. It is, after all, a serious thesis about Samuel Beckett.
But as far as I could understand it, it seemed pretty good.

"It won a prize," Duchovny says. "It won the English-thesis
prize, whatever that is. I do remember one chapter is called
'Breaking Wind on the Aeolian Harp.'"

I fetch it from my bag. "It's horrible," Duchovny tells Carter.
"It's like reading a manual about surgery."

Nonetheless, Duchovny grabs at it keenly. "Look at all those
footnotes!" he says with pride. "I must say I'm tickled
by seeing this." He leafs through, beginning to remember.
The first sentence is "Beckett is misunderstood."

"You know," he says, "somehow, looking at this makes me
feel like in the movies where somebody has returned from
the insane asylum and they're showing you the work that
you did while you were in there."

I want you to tell me what "unanalvigorously" means.

I have no idea. It's one of those things I used to know. It's
shocking to think that you used to be smarter than yourself.

Overall, do you remember what your point was?

[Pause] Gosh. That's a really good question. [Long pause] No.
I have no idea what my thesis was. What was I saying?

You don't often see the sentence "Escaping with the insane
homunculus, Lemuel starts out on the Malone Styx."

[Nods] At least not from an actor on a prime-time television
show. [Finding a quote of Beckett's] This is such a great quote.
Read that.

[Reading] "She had a hole between her legs, oh not the bunghole
I had always imagined, but a slit, and in this I put, or rather she
put, my so-called virile member... but lent myself to it with a good
grace, knowing it was love, for she had told me so... Perhaps after
all she put me in her rectum. A matter of complete indifference
to me, I needn't tell you. But is it true love in the rectum?"

Isn't that funny? "Is it true love in the rectum!"
That's like the theme of anyone's life. [To Carter] Look,
I allude to Yeats here: "Taking ever so literally that
love has pitched its tent in the place of excrement."

I don't think the phrase "in the place of excrement"
has been in 'US' magazine before.

Excrement's a very interesting subject. There are only
three really fascinating subjects to every person on the
planet: sex, money and s---.

And for a man, they relate to the three most important
orifices: the mouth, the anus and the pockets.

Oh, I wish I had said that. Will you make it so I had said that!

But you're in a successful TV series that manages to
avoid all three subjects most of the time.

Well segued. It's true. But significantly, I think, in THE
X-FILES, the intensity of the absence is such that it becomes
a presence. The so-total lack of sex and so-total lack of any
monetary discussion, the so-total lack of any bodily function
encodes in it its presence. Which is why people go on about
the sexual tension between Gillian and me. I think what is
interesting is that there is so much penetration of bodies on
our show, violent penetration: maggots crawling out of mouths,
and knives and guns. Every kind of bodily penetration except
for sexual. [Laughs] But Is It True Love in the Rectum:
The Autobiography of David Duchovny. Do you think I
could publish this! Like Paul Reiser published Babyhood'
Do you think there's a market out there for a book
on Beckett from a celebrity?

Duchovny is joking. I point this out only because,
generally, along with Beckett, Duchovny is misunderstood.


__________________



__________________




From Movieline Magazine July 1998

ClichEJuice
by David Duchovny
Home is where the heart is and my heart is
out travelling. Up into the wild blue yonder,
wingless, prayerful that this miracle of flight
will not end,just yet
Also at home, with you, on the ground
wherever you might he at the moment, grounded
like a highschooler, like a wire, a bird and a wire,
feet on the ground and my heart in my throat now, now
in my feet, lawfully descending with gravity
to the lower, lowest, most sought after
most beautifully bound, home.
Aspirations involve reparations. We reach
for the stars wondering what we are.
But my Reason has been found
by finding you and looking down And it is there,
not in the stars of fantasized worlds, fifth
dimensions, sixth senses, holy parallel potentates of
potentialities-that my feet will trace
their slow as history itself dance:
a walking calligraphy so subtle that it will take 40 years
and more and a view from above
with an impersonal remove and lofty attachment I hope
to barely fail at that mythical two-backed beast; itinerant stasis;
like the one I enjoy up here in the well attended air,
to read the cursive strokes of my aggregate footsteps,
like some fairy tale dissolve, "Once upon a time" or twice
written on our little page of earth, ground,
wherever our home may he
will be
wherever we happen
to be.

David Ecompletamente vegetariano?
No, he is not. In addition to the fish & sushi that he rhapsodized
about in AMERICAN WAY, he ate fish & chips on LETTERMAN.
And he likes his mother's haggis:

http://groups-beta.google.com/group...de=source&hl=en
"My mother identified very strongly with where she
came from and made it a part of our lives. We had haggis,
which I like, and porridge.

My mother also made clootie dumplings which we'd have at
Christmas and Thanksgiving with custard. Afterwards she'd fry
the dumpling with sugar. My mother's dumplings are great."

And don't forget how he made fun of the hysterically strict
vegetarian extras in "Hollywood AD"
Dunno about transcripts/videos, but it was the LETTERMAN
from 5-18-95, the week the show was taped in the UK.
I think it was the same show where Peter O'Toole arrived
onstage on a camel. DD didn't actually eat the food onstage.
Towards the end of his segment, DL asked DD if he'd like
some of the fish'n'chips that were being served at a stand or
something just outside the studio. DD said yes. His segment
ended & he left the stage. Then in the commercial break that
followed the *next* segment, they showed a brief shot of DD
happily munching his fish'n'chips at the vendor's stand.

The AW interview has been preserved because the wise,
kindly folk at American Airlines have archived it on their
website all these years
http://www.americanwaymag.com/trave..._date=6/15/2001


Sobre a fofoca de David jogando um copo descartavel de cafEno paparazzi.
It seems the DD content
is going to center around The Coffee Toss, as part of a
"when celebrities finally fight back" segment.
That was the coffee toss shot, from when the paparazzi were
stalking them in NY after their wedding. The same shot aired
on ACCESS HOLLYWOOD on 13 May 1997 -- it's from the
camera that was being held by the woman he was tossing the
coffee cup at. The beach shot at the end of the program is one
I've never seen before, but I'm pretty sure it *was* DD.I think that the coffee David threw was just a cup...without coffee. I mean I taped this show in hopes to see David FLIP out and really THROW the coffee at her. That was not a throw...that wasn't even an under hand pitch in a little league of...softball. I had to rewind it about three times and laugh as I saw it because it doesn't even look like it hit the woman...it's like it hit the ground and that cup 'floated' it's way down to the pavement because I seriously saw it glide...

The one at the end is David and I've never seen it before (like lots of David sightings) but he looked cute. Yeah...he looked a little mad...but let's face it, he didn't throw the football or even try to.

I understand how crazy these people are and how...they seem to have no control over themselves when it comes to getting footage of celebrities, but if I were one of them, David would not even scare me... Maybe Tommy Lee...what he did would shake me a bit, but David showed his discomfort and his annoyed face, but he stayed pretty cool in my opinion.
Um trecho da Tese de Mestrado de David em Princeton.
Beckett is misunderstood. Historically there are two ways of approaching his novels. Beckett, secretary to James Joyce and Beckett, existentialist. The first interprettation regards the younger expatriate Irishman in subservient rebellion to the master. Where Joyce's experimental vocabulary and allusive reach seem almost limitless, the tendency of Beckett's work after Murphy has been a relentless verbal adtrophy, a paring down of Joyce's embellished edifices. Beckett's unique style is thus seen as initiated by Joyce's original, provocative genius. His path paved by the virtuousity of his elder, Beckett is in some sense the brilliant negative to James Joyce. Some of these critics imply that Joyce's adventurousness necessiated a rebellion, and had it not been Beckett it would have been someone like Beckett. Like all criticism which would make that bold leap from a discovery of influence to an asserrtion of derivation, viewing Beckett as Joyce's offspring constructs a pleasing order in dialectical literary history, but it does little for the understanding of Beckett's originality.

A tese tem 160 paginas não numeradas.
If I remember from the previous topic before it went into 'net heaven, pam posted the info on how you could get a copy of David's thesis and how much it costs. Maybe she can post it again? Oh pam...
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


http://libweb5.princeton.edu/theses...id.asp?ID=14832
===>
Princeton University Senior Theses Full Record
TITLE: The Schizophrenic Critique of Pure Reason in Beckett's Early Novels (160 pages).
AUTHOR: David William Duchovny (1982), English Department
LOCATED AT: Mudd Library.

Contact the Princeton University Archives at the Seeley G. Mudd
Manuscript Library, 65 Olden Street, Princeton, NJ 08544;
phone 609-258-6345; fax 609-258-3385; or send email
to mudd@davidduchovny.com.br to locate a thesis of interest.
<===


http://www.princeton.edu/mudd/news/...otocopies.shtml
===>
How do I order photocopies?

If you visit the Mudd Library, a member of our staff will be
happy to show you how to identify materials for photocopying
and how to submit your photocopy order.

You may also order photocopies without visiting the Mudd Library.
To do so:

EIdentify the collection, box, and folder you want copied.

ESend your request via e-mail (mudd@davidduchovny.com.br) or surface
mail to the Mudd Manuscript Library, 65 Olden Street, Princeton,
NJ 08544. (Please include your name, address and fax number.)

EA member of our staff will estimate the total number of pages
in your order and send you our photoduplication order form.
Complete prices are available online.

EReturn the signed form with payment (check drawn on U.S.
account or money order) to the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library.

EStaff will copy the materials and mail them to you.
Requests are usually completed within three weeks from
date your order and payment are received.

Note: the photoduplication form is not available online.
We do not currently accept credit cards.
<===


when I contacted them back in 1999, they told me it would be $50:

===>
Dear Pam:

Thank you for your inquiry concerning David W. Duchovny's
senior thesis, "The Schizophrenic Critique of Pure Reason
in Beckett's Early Novels." The charge for photoduplicating
material in our collections is twenty-five cents per page
plus postage. The total cost of your 160-page order would
therefore be $50.00.

If you wish to proceed, please provide us with your full name
and postal address, so we can send you a photoduplication
order form, which you will have to sign and return to us,
together with a check or money order in the above amount
made payable to the Princeton University Library. All
orders must be prepaid and are processed in order of receipt,
usually within two to three weeks. Please note that in
signing the photoduplication order form, you are agreeing to
abide by the copyright law of the United States and to refrain
from using Mr. Duchovny's senior thesis "for any purpose
other than private study, scholarship or research."
<===


In that same thread, TyFusion quoted US magazine quoting
DD's thesis (remember the days when US actually contained
original interviews that lasted longer than 1 paragraph???):

===>
"In Murphy's theology, undifferentiated chaos confronts
God with its unnameable yawn. Like a sculptor with flawed
stone, God does his best with what he is given and puns
on the word to create the world. It is not a great pun and
certainly not one of Murphy's favorites. The only evidence
of theophany appears as the verbal transformation of the
lowly neurotic into the holy psychotic schizophrenic."
<===


Casa de DAvid
They moved from the former house on the cliff overlooking the beach on Point Dume (west of the PCH) to their current home in the hills east of the PCH back in *late 1999*. The tabloids claimed the move was because the clifftop house wouldn't be so safe with West soon to be running around -- alternatively, DD had once described the cliff house as having only 2 bedrooms, so perhaps they simply wanted more space. The Writing Room that DD painted that perfect shade of Italian orange would be in the current house. The master bathroom from which you could see the ocean while sitting in the tub would have been in the former cliff house (you can actually see the tub in some aerial photos of that house).


It's from People Magazine May 6, 1996. Here is the picture. Not the best one in MHO.

Here is what it said about him:
His older brother called him ugly says David Duchovny 35 who plays the intriguingly, buttoned down Fox Mulder on the X-Files. Soon that caught on with his friend, along with names like Big Nose and Big Lips. Duchovny is still self conscious about his nose, and the rest of his face, for that matter. He describes it as at war with itself. a condition he attributes to the mongrel vigor he inherited from his Russian father and his Scottish mother. But these days, Duchovny is the only one griping about his looks. His XF fans the David Duchovny Estrogen Brigade on the internet still recal his all to brief appearacne last season in a skimpy speedo. That sneak peek at his lean limbs was a bonus for those who had already fallen for his crooked smile and ironic wit. The sexy thing about David is his mind, says actress Bonnie Hunt, a friend the Princeton grad since they both appeared in the 1989 Beethoven, But if he fell on his head tomorrow and list his memory, he'd still be pretty sexy guy. Casting director Johanna Ray, who hired Duchovny to play a transvestite cop in 1990's Twin Peaks, calls him the sort of man you can rely on. Rely on him to downplay the hype. His grooming routine? Flossing. As he explains, You don't want to be caught by the paparazzi with spinach in your teeth.

The people picked that year were:

Brooke Shields
Pierce Brosnan
Chilli
Demi Moore
Johnny Depp
Shanon Sturges
Fran Drescher
Matthew Fox
Jenny McCarthy
Mel Gibson
MIra Sorvino
Steve Largent
Navia Nguyen
Laird Hamilton
Jon Bon Jovi
Gloria Reuben
Michelle Pfeiffer
David Duchovny
Tyra Banks
Chris O Donnell
Josie Bissett
John Walsh
Lela Rochon
Antonio Banderas
Keith Hamilton Cobb
Ashley Judd
George Clooney
Marth Steward
David Guterson
Ed Gordon
Gail O Grady
Patrick Muldoon
Brandy
Patty Cabrera
Brad Pitt

A história da tatuagem. Madelaine West teve uma infecção virótica e bacterológica nos pulmões e pneumonia dupla, quase morrendo. Esta foi uma das principais razões de David ter deixado Arquivo x, uma série que lhe tirava muito tempo que ele poderia estar pasando com a famú‰ia.
Movieline Magazine December 2000 "The Truth About Téa"

Q: So it must have traumatic when your daughter was so ill last year.
A: You know, right after her spinal tap was clear and everyone breathed a sigh of relief, David went around the corner from the hospital and put a tattoo of her name on his ankle. He was so altered by this experience he had to go out and physically mark it.

Q: What exactly happened to her?
A: She had a respiratory virus and a double viral/bacterial pneumonia on top of that. Nobody told me, "We'll see if she makes it through the night," but as we were leaving the hospital, one of the doctors said, "Boy, that was quite a scare she gave us when we almost lost her." I remember thinking, this is the first relationship I've ever known that will only end with my death. There's no other way out of it. Though I have no intention of leaving other important relationships, there's a sort of lightness of being in knowing that they could end and I could still take care of myself. But not even in her death would this relationship end. It would only end with mine. I had to sit with that one for a while.

Q: All of which you never thought about until you had her in your arms and said, "This is for real."
A: Yeah. I was in labor for 30 hours and I thought it was great. My water broke at 3 a.m. when David was just walking in from work. He turned around and started walking back out the door, and I said, "No, no, relax, go to sleep, take a bath." This crazy calm came over me. Talk about entering the zone. I got to pull her out and I burst into tears as she was splashing around on my stomach. That was the brightest moment in my life.

Q: Did you take pictures?
A: We said, "We're not picture people." Luckily our ignorance was overridden by the nurse in the room who said, "Just give me the f**king camera. You're gonna want them later."
On the day West had to be taken to hospital, because of a respiratory virus: "We had to give her a spinal tap at one point, which was very difficult, It required that somebody - me - hold the baby in a position so that they could stick a needle in her back. It was extremely scary and painful - and you know that you may find out that your child is facing meningitis, which is not good news. David said, 'I think I should let you go in, you do this...' because only one of us could be there. I said, 'OK, but tell me now - if I weren't here you would do it?' He replied, 'My God, you know I would...'. [After going through the whole procedure and finally being given the news that West's test was clear] the nurse said, 'Oh, your husband said he has gone out for a couple of hours. He's going to bring back dinner, though'. And I thought, 'How could you, where are you?' He came in with this look in his eye. And I instantly understood. [Note: He had gone to get West's name tatooed in his ankle] I think that at the moment he had heard the test was clear and we were really coming out of the woods, he was so emotionally and spiritually altered that he physically wanted to go and mark it. I felt the same. I remember talking to my mother, who said, 'You know, not every mother has to face this'. She meant the real possibility of losing a child. And she said, 'You'll make it through, you will make it.' And then when we did she said, 'Now you have really arrived in motherhood'." (Martyn Palmer, "Now our baby is OK, David and I are so changed. We just feel invincible", Sunday Express, December 2000)
but actually what West had was RSV (which is a very serious infection all by itself!) and double pneumonia which is worse than either one of the other she had both! This is tremendously serious and I'm not surprised that she was teetering on the edge overlooking that abyss. And the fact that she did make it is huge in and of itself. But for a very thin edge to her favor she could have easily have slipped to the other side and died. As a mother myself I cannot imagine having to face such serious illness. We were, my husband and I, very blessed in that our son pretty much never had anything that critical.

"In terms of skill, Roni Zulu is considered one of the top artists in his field. His celebrity-client list includes Janet Jackson, Dennis Rodman, Rosie OfDonnell, Lisa Bonet, David Duchovny, Danny Elfman and Queen Latifah. He speaks proudly of the large works hefs done on local body-art legends, including drag hostess Divinity Fudge and bulldagger photographer Marina Spike. Zulu believes in the process, and his clientele tends to be interested in acquiring a meaningful tattoo. The experience should be interactive to some extent: gI encourage clients to get involved in the creation of their sacred markings as we work together to bring that which is within you to the surface,h Zulu states."

Supporting the Environment
Some folks may have already read the long version, so here's the short 1.
Driving a hybrid vehicle, attending An Inconvenient Truth premiere in a hybrid vehicle, & siging support for 1 of the coolest bills passed in California that I can remember.
In 2002, he signed support for California's AB 1058 to Clean Up Global Warming Pollution from Cars--(SUPPORT FOR AB 1058: A BILL TO REDUCE GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS FROM PASSENGER VEHICLES IN CALIFORNIA) http://www.bluewaternetwork.org/reports/rep_ca_global_ab1058list.pdf
AB 1493 was a successor to AB 1058 & was signed into law in July 2002.
...The California legislature passed a bill to address greenhouse gas emissions from cars and light trucks...the first time that a state has moved to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from cars and light trucks. California has unique authority under the Clean Air Act to establish stricter pollution rules for vehicles than the federal government...http://www.cleancarcampaign.org/20020715update.shtml. The automotive industry has sued in court, stating that this is simply a way to impose gas mileage standards on automobiles--a field already preempted by federal rules. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_Air_Resources_Board
Duchovny signed support for a bill so innovative that it was the 1st in the nation of its kind & so controversial that the auto industry felt threatened enough to try to block its enforcement in court. If you're gonna support sthing, go all the way. Completely kick ass, yeah?
Supporting LGBT Rights
Some folks here know about Duchovny (& Anderson) signing support for same sex marriage). But this really got my attention--his role in developing "The Way Out."
David Duchovny Taking The Way Out, By Romeo San Vicente Published: April 27, 2006, San Francisco Bay Times
Gay-themed films tend to ignore the fact that there is such a thing as a gay old man. But in the upcoming movie The Way Out, the life challenges of senior gay men are put into sharp focus. Produced by David Duchovny (Connie and Carla, The X-Files), as well as by openly gay actors Robert Gant (Queer as Folk) and Chad Allen (The End of the Spear) for Mythgarden Productions, the narrative feature explores the difficult transition from independence to assisted living for an aging gay man. http://www.sfbaytimes.com/index.php?sec=article&article_id=4951
To put this into context, SF Bay Times is the Bay Area LGBT Newspaper & Calendar. Duchovny's putting his $$$ where his mouth is re: LGBT rights.

I thought that was great, but then I found this interview w/Robert Gant (Queer as Folk) on "The Way Out:"
Interviewer: ...I think if a movie were made about the gay elderly, and if it were done right, it could potentially have a powerful impact on society, you know? Because everyone cares about becoming elderly, gay or straight.[/i]
Gant: [Excited.] We're doing it! It's the second feature of our production company, and it's called "The Way Out." David Duchovny read an article in the New York Times about an older gay man whose lover died, and he went to live in a retirement home, and the nightmare that this man experienced. And so David commissioned a friend to write a script -- it was a mutual friend, and we just fell in love with it. http://www.planetout.com/entertainment/interview.html?sernum=969
Duchovny not only put up his own $$$ to get it made, it was his idea in the 1st place. Instead of trying to write the script himself, he got someone else to do it. I can't find the name of the writer, but I'd assume that the reason Duchovny didn't write it himself is that he's not gay. Better to write what you've lived---what you know, than to write what you haven't lived, so don't know. Phenomenal--& respectful as hell.
Between these 2 issues, here's a guy who puts his time, energy, & cash into making these things happen, not just his celebrity. I'm so sick & disgusted w/how so many celebrities use causes to look good--LOOK AT ME! LOOK AT ME! AREN"T I WONDERFUL AND KIND?---instead of doing the right thing behind the scenes b/c it's right. Unbelievably decent of the guy
DD and TL have been very active in the Malibu region, opposing a proposed natural gas drilling operation that would be 14 miles from the California coast (in international waters). Along with Pierce Brosnan and other local residents, the Duchovnys are demanding independent environmental impact studies and security studies (since this would be a PERFECT terrorist target), and assurances beyond federal and state regulations that the project would be safe as well as beneficial.

As to "The Way Out", I am impressed with his "putting his money where his mouth is" attitude, which goes far beyond signing a petition. Film is a POWERFUL way to effect social change on a mass basis! While I am not gay, many of my friends are gay or lesbian, and fight an uphill battle for relationship rights that "straight" people take for granted every day. Believe me, it's hard enough for "straight" couples and singles when they get older and need to move into an assisted living home...the issues for gay couples and singles must feel postively daunting.

They also serve who work quietly, effectively, sincerely and steadily behind the scenes to bring about the greater good.
All I really remember is that it was based nowhere near Malibu or NYC - somewhere in the midwest, I believe) and "Mr. and Mrs. David Duchovny" were listed very unceremoniously, along with "Mr. and Mrs. Pantaleoni" (Tea's parents). I thought that was cool, because neither of them had ever brought it up or sought publicity for their involvement in any way - so who knows how much more they do 'behind the scenes'?
Ratings key

Saturation - 2000 plus playdates
Wide - 600 to 1999 playdates
Limited - 11 to 599 playdates
Exclusive - Under 10 playdates (1 to 3 per major market)
Regional - Varied screen count (not nationwide coverage)
Expansion - Significant increase in playdates but remaining within bounds of previous pattern
Test - A pre-release to test marketing campaigns and the viability of wider release